Thursday, July 16, 2009

Ayers Rock and Mount Sinai


Imagine that the all Australian aborigines since time immemorial claimed that space aliens had appeared to them at Ayers Rock one spring day 3,300 years ago. Those aliens left the aborigines with a book which contained unique, extremely insightful advice for living (just as the Torah contains unique wisdom). The later history of the aborigines was also unique and indicated some massively influential, ancient event (as does Jewish history and Jewish literature).

I think that most people, including most scientists, would regard this as credible evidence that intelligent life does exist elsewhere in the universe. Indeed even much less evidence, for example a narrow-band radio signal, would be considered by scientists to be solid evidence of extraterrestrial intelligence.

However, once we mention “religion”, everything changes. In regards to the Torah being revealed at Mount Sinai, although similar evidence is presented, the majority of the scientific and academic community rejects it as being insufficient and unconvincing.

I think the explanation for this is very simple: massive denial. The book of advice left by the space aliens would not obligate anyone to do anything. The Torah makes demands, sometimes huge demands, on people. Suddenly, all evidence is insufficient, so it’s all dismissed as myth.

9 comments:

alex said...

"I think that most people, including most scientists, would regard this as credible evidence that intelligent life does exist elsewhere in the universe."

I think that most scientists would say there was a time BEFORE "since time immemorial" when some clever dude gave his advice on that mountain. Later on, the natives fictionalized the account.

Anonymous said...

Bring a single artifact that is clearly alien and you have your proof. Bring blurry photos and videos that an eighth grader could make with cheap software and no one will accept it.

Bring a book and propose it is from the 12th century and accompanied world changing events, and bring no evidence at all of other cultures witnessing these events or mentioning them at all, and you will have the same problem as the eighth grader.

Also, ask your grandfather if he saw the giving of Torah. I can asure you he will not remember having seen it. The same was true of those in the 7th century BCE. None of there grandfathers could confirm anything. (Once again, this does not prove that the Torah was not given in the 12th CBCE. It simply says that there is still no evidence one way or the other.)

YEG

Days Long Gone said...

"Imagine that the all Australian aborigines since time immemorial claimed that space aliens had appeared to them at Ayers Rock one spring day 3,300 years ago."

If you have the year given as 3300 years ago, then "time immemorial" is a mistaken phrase.

jewish philosopher said...

"Bring a book and propose it is from the 12th century and accompanied world changing events, and bring no evidence at all of other cultures witnessing these events or mentioning them at all, and you will have the same problem as the eighth grader."

I don't really think so.

Scientists would consider even a narrow band radio signal be proof of extraterrestrial intelligence.

http://www.seti.org/Page.aspx?pid=558#a3

I think a remarkable national tradition and literature would suffice.

Anonymous said...

But no one would believe that their grandfathers saw it if their grandfathers said they didn't. No one woudl believe that the there was a national revelation if someone made it up, then tried to convince them. Most sane people woudl ask, "why is this the first time I'm hearing this, and why didn't anyone write it down.

Anonymous said...

This is off topic, but still interesting, so forgive me:


http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/bpl/pala/2009/00000052/00000003/art00001

More evidence that the fossil record does not show evolution.

Anonymous said...

To anonymous (July 17), you are correct in saying that, theoretically, such a lie can indeed be propogated.

My challenge to you is to find ONE other example of an entire nation becoming convinced of a significant, nation-wide event. Theoretically, I agree it seems very plausible to suggest such a thing, but the lack of any other examples should cause us to not accept your theory.

Anonymous said...

Where did you get the information about the "alien book"? Because I have tried to find other information that supports it and I couldn't find any.

jewish philosopher said...

It's just an analogy to Torah.